The institute
for the study of canadian slavery

Thomas Suntherland after James Hakewill, “Trinity Estate, St. Mary’s,” 1825, hand-coloured aquatint

Most people don’t know about the
200-year history of slavery on
Canadian soil.

The Institute will change that by revealing, preserving, and sharing the complex and interwoven  histories of bondage, slave  ownership, cultural contact, and colonial commerce.

About the Institute

about the institute

William Clark, The Court-House, 1823, hand-coloured aquatint

The Institute will provide a one-of-a-kind destination with the space, resources, and community for scholars, artists and cultural producers to create work related to Canadian Slavery and its legacies.

 

Wm. Notman & Son, G. Conway andfriends, Montreal, 1901
Silver salts on paper mounted on paper

Mandate and Goals

mandate and goals

William Clark, Carting and Putting Sugar-Hogsheads on Board, 1823, hand-coloured aquatint

 

Richardson, “Four Guineas Reward,” Nova-Scotia
Gazette and Weekly Chronicle, Tuesday, 5 September
1780, vol. 10, no. 744, p. 3; Public Archives NS

Through a variety of archival materials, art, and artifacts, the Institute will share the stories of the lives and experiences of the enslaved in Canada that might otherwise remain hidden, misunderstood, and devalued.

Through a variety of archival materials, art, and artifacts, the Institute will share the stories of the lives and experiences of the enslaved in Canada that might otherwise remain hidden, misunderstood, and devalued.

 

Richardson, “Four Guineas Reward,” Nova-Scotia Gazette and Weekly Chronicle, Tuesday, 5 September 1780, vol. 10, no. 744, p. 3; Public Archives NS

The team

the team

Dr. Charmaine A. Nelson is a professor of art history, NSCAD University’s Tier 1 Canada Research Chair in Transatlantic Black Diasporic Art and Community Engagement, and the founding director of The Institute for the Study of Canadian Slavery.

She is supported by research assistants Emily Davidson, Katelyn Clark and Achini Ranasinghege.

 

Dr. Charmaine A. Nelson
by Meghan Tansey Whitton

Join Us

join us

Agostino Brunias, Linen Market, Dominica (1780), oil on canvas, 49.8 x 68.6 cm.

Fellows

The Institute supports and promotes traditional academic fellows and
artists-in-residence working in its mandate areas through funding, office or studio space,
and library access that allows for research and production time,
peer-support, mentorship, and exhibition/collaboration opportunities.

Study

The Institute’s only designated faculty is its director, Dr. Nelson. However, as cohorts of postdoctoral fellows becomes more established, a part of their role will be to teach courses relevant to their disciplinary expertise.

Dr. Nelson is scheduled to teach ‘The Visual Culture of Slavery’ (AHIS 4401) during NSCAD’s winter 2022 semester.

An investment in the Institute is an investment in reconciliation and progress
towards a more just and equitable society for all Canadians. Changing our
knowledge of and conversations about the past through our established
institutions and structures is an important step forward. If you would like to
support a fellow, an artist-in-residence, or programming, donate today.

Participate

The Institute will host and convene various conferences, exhibitions, lectures,
readings, screenings, workshops, and other events. Students, scholars, artists,
cultural workers, and the general public are welcome to attend and to participate.